A Gentleman in Moscow

Quick Overview
More than half a million readers have fallen in love with the New York Times bestseller A Gentleman in Moscow 'Everything a novel should be: charming, witty, poetic and generous. An absolute delight' Mail on Sunday 'A work of great charm, intelligence and insight' Sunday Times 'Winning . . . gorgeous . . . satisfying . . . Towles is a craftsman' New York Times Book Review 'A comic masterpiece' Daily Express 'If we do a better book than this one on the book club this year we will be very very lucky' Matt Williams, Radio 2 Book Club 'Abundant in humour, history and humanity' Sunday Telegraph 'Wistful, whimsical and wry' Sunday Express On 21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov - recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt - is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the Count has been sentenced to house arrest indefinitely. While Russia undergoes decades of tumultuous upheaval, the Count, stripped of the trappings that defined his life, is forced to question what makes us who we are. And with the assistance of a glamorous actress, a cantankerous chef and a very serious child, Rostov unexpectedly discovers a new understanding of both pleasure and purpose.

More than half a million readers have fallen in love with the New York Times bestseller A Gentleman in Moscow 'Everything a novel should be: charming, witty, poetic and generous. An absolute delight' Mail on Sunday 'A work of great charm, intelligence and insight' Sunday Times 'Winning . . . gorgeous . . . satisfying . . . Towles is a craftsman' New York Times Book Review 'A comic masterpiece' Daily Express 'If we do a better book than this one on the book club this year we will be very very lucky' Matt Williams, Radio 2 Book Club 'Abundant in humour, history and humanity' Sunday Telegraph 'Wistful, whimsical and wry' Sunday Express On 21 June 1922 Count Alexander Rostov - recipient of the Order of Saint Andrew, member of the Jockey Club, Master of the Hunt - is escorted out of the Kremlin, across Red Square and through the elegant revolving doors of the Hotel Metropol. But instead of being taken to his usual suite, he is led to an attic room with a window the size of a chessboard. Deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the Count has been sentenced to house arrest indefinitely. While Russia undergoes decades of tumultuous upheaval, the Count, stripped of the trappings that defined his life, is forced to question what makes us who we are. And with the assistance of a glamorous actress, a cantankerous chef and a very serious child, Rostov unexpectedly discovers a new understanding of both pleasure and purpose.

*Yellowed pages*

More Information
AuthorAmor Towles
PublisherWindmill Books
PlaceLondon
Year2017
ISBN9780099558781
BindingPaperback
ConditionGood
CommentsYellowed pages
0
Rating:
0% of 100
Write Your Own Review
Only registered users can write reviews. Please Sign in or create an account

How we describe the condition of our books

We are very proud of the condition of the books we sell (please read our testimonials to find out more!)

New: Exactly as it says.

As New: Pretty much new but shows small signs of having been read; inside it will be clean without any inscriptions or stamps; might contain a remainder mark.

Very Good: Might have some creases on the spine; no hard cracks; maybe slight forward lean and short inscription inside; perhaps very minor bumping on the corners of the book; inside clean but the page edges might be slightly yellowed.

Good: A few creases on the spine, perhaps a forward lean, bumping on corners or shelfwear; maybe an inscription inside or some shelfwear or a small tear or two on the dustjacket; inside but page edges might be somewhat yellowed.

Fair: In overall good condition, might have a severe forward lean to the spine, an inscription, bumping to corners; one or two folds on the covers and yellowed pages; in exceptional cases these books might contain some library stamps and stickers or have neat sticky tape which was used to fix a short, closed tear.

Poor: We rarely sell poor condition books, unless the books are in demand and difficult to find in a better condition. Poor condition books are still perfect for a good read, all pages will be intact and none threatening to fall out; most probably a reading copy only.