Blood, Sweat and Arrogance: And the Myth of Churchill's War

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Why were the British, victorious in 1918, unable to match the Germans in 1940—and why were these pioneers of tank warfare overcome for so long by Germany’s panzers? This caustic critique exposes just how close England came to losing World War II, and in the process overturns the reputations of some of Britain’s most famous generals. Churchill takes heavy blame for the poor state of the British forces in 1939, while Montgomery is revealed to have much skill with a pen…but very little in command. It’s a brilliant, eye-opening reassessment, from policy decisions in the 1920s to the great campaigns of 1939-45.

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Gordon Corrigan's Mud, Blood and Poppycock overturned the myths that surround the First World War. Now he challenges our assumptions about the Second World War in this brilliant, caustic narrative that exposes just how close Britain came to losing. He reveals how Winston Churchill bears a heavy responsibility for the state of our forces in 1939, and how his interference in military operations caused a string of disasters. The reputations of some of our most famous generals are also overturned: above all, Montgomery, whose post-war stature owes more to his skill with a pen than talent for command. But this is not just a story of personalities.

Gordon Corrigan investigates how the British, who had the biggest and best army in the world in 1918, managed to forget everything they had learned in just twenty years. The British invented the tank, but in 1940 it was the Germans who showed the world how to use them. After we avoided defeat, but the slimmest of margins, it was a very long haul to defeat Hitler's army, and one in which the Russians would ultimately bear the heaviest burden.

More Information
AuthorGordon Corrigan
PublisherPhoenix Press
PlaceLondon
Year2007
ISBN9780304367382
BindingPaperback
ConditionVery Good
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